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right; but something claiming kindred, before us were first published in the not with the passions of the moment in years 1822, 1823 and 1824. When it which it originates, but with the great was determined by Mr. Colburn to rebody of general and admitted truth; print them, Mr. Curran availed himself or if doubtful, only doubted by persons of the opportunity afforded by the denying the authority of the great publication to make some additions to names which he calls as bis vouchers. what had been originally published. In Sheil, too, there are not unfre. We believe that what appeared in the quently stinging sarcasms which not Magazine is preserved unchanged; but only were calculated to inflict severe

there is prefixed a memoir of the late wounds on the objects of his satire, Chief Baron Woulfe, written within but what was infinitely worse, to call the present year, and a record of some into active life the malignant passions conversations with Chief Justice Bushe, both of those whom he amused and noted down in 1826. those whom he attacked. Sheil's artis In our account of the book, the ea. cles, in short, are too like association siest course is to follow the author's arspeeches. There can be no doubt that rangement in the present publication. bis political position, struggling at the In the sketches written in 1823, with time for emancipation, made much the persons who are the subjects of his of this very natural, and perhaps, there

portraiture each day brought before fore, very excusable; but from our own

his eye and before his mind, written feelings we can judge those of others, also in a period of great political ex. and we own that we still feel pain and citement, the style is more vivid than grief at the insults such men as Moore in the picture of Woulfe. To our and Sheil have, to the great injury of selves, who cannot throw our mind their reputation and of the perma- back into those days of old contests, nent effect of their works, indulged in even in imagination, and to whom the against every one whom it answered a

strange passages of Irish history which temporary purpose to abuse.

occurred in our day are, in truth, a We have no doubt that in such cases forgotten dream, greater pleasure has as we allude to, such men as Moore been afforded by this sketch of Woulfe, and Sheil are, in reality, but indulging drawn up fifteen years after his death, a lively imagination, and are engaged than by the papers describing the living in what to them are as really works of actors of Mr. Curran's earlier sketches. fiction, and, therefore, as subject to It is written in a calmer tone, and with their own caprices of the hour, as their

great beauty brings out, one by one, “ Selims," and " Evadnes." The of.

as they rise up to recollection, the disfence is not in the feelings which they tinguishing peculiarities of a friend, experience, but in those they are likely lost too early, and who, but for this to excite. In Mr.Curran's “Sketches,' memoir, would have soon passed away there is not one single word with which

from the memory of all but a fow, and any one can reasonably quarrel; there died without his fame. is not one single proposition which, Woulfe was born in 1786, received whether you agree with it or not-and his earlier education at Stonyhurst, we often do not agree with him-you graduated in the University of Dub must not admit to be fairly stated. lin, and was called to the Irish bar in It is really a curious fact, consider- 1814. ing the state of Ireland at the time Mr. Curran's acquaintance with him when these “ Sketches ” were written, commenced in 1813, when both were to observe that, republished after an fellow-students at the Middle Temple. interval of thirty years, there is not in his part of the work one word to

“I cannot," says Mr. Curran, “refrain alter or omit, though everywhere strong

from stating with, I hope, excusable pride, political opinions are firmly and man

that our acquaintanceship was no sooner

formed, than he not so much selected, as fully expressed, with no other reserve

seized upon me as his friend, and that the but what arises from the ordinary cordial grasp, once given, was never relaxed, suggestions of gentlemanly feeling. until his hold upon all things in this life was

The papers reprinted in the volumes gone from him for ever.

* " Sketches of the Irish Bar, with Essays Literary and Political." By W. H. Curran, Esq. London. 1855.

" When I became acquainted with Wonlfe was from the first uncertain. There in London, I found him standing very high was no inability to bear bodily or in the opinion and predictions of his asso

mental fatigue ; there was delicacy of ciates there, among the most intimate of

frame, freedom and elasticity of movewhom I may name the late Mr. Sheil, the late William Wallace, afterwards the writer

ment. This our author has to state

before he states the infirmity of .conof the continuation of Sir James Mackintosh's History of England, the present Judge

stitution which made him, through the Ball, and Mr. Thomas Wyse, now the Bri- greater part of his life, subject to distish Minister at Athens. All the qualities ease in one form or other. How is: which were, in after life, to recommend him this to be stated ?- in what way best to a wider circle, were already conspicuously brought before the mind ? How would developed—his social, joyous temperament, Goldsmith-how would Scott have exhis freedom from all selfishness, his hatred hibited it? In such things the hand of baseness, his admiration of worth, his

of the artist appears. Read now the kindly, circumspect regard for the feelings of others, his perfect candour, and, among his

passage that follows:-mental attributes, his sound and manly “ In his frame there was no apparent detastes, and, most of all, the high order of his licacy; it was slight, but all his movements reasoning powers." —pp. 5, 6.

free and healthy : and so of his countenance;

though the features were rather thin and Curran and Woulfe were so much sharp, the expression was usually animated, together, that but few letters passed often joyous, occasionally grave and thoughtbetween them. It may be said, too, ful, but never depressed. As I write, I rethat men whose minds are fully en

member that, about this period, a small gaged bave little time for letter-writ- party of his friends (he not being present) ing. In Sheil's Life, lately published,

amused themselves by going through some his biographer tells us that he wrote

of the leading varieties of the canine species,

and discovering a fanciful resemblance benone but absolutely necessary business

tween each of them and some member of the letters. One or two letters of Woulfe's,

bar. Matches for the bull-dog, and spaniel, however, remain among his friend's and cur, were easily found. There was more papers. Of these, one, written from discussion in finding the fittest representaInspruck in 1815, is here published; tives of the lurcher and poodle, and so on; from that letter we extract a charac- but when the greyhound was named, and teristic sentence:

Shiel on the instant cried out Woulfe,' the

likeness of the kind they were searching for, "The towns in Italy have a much more even to something curious in the details, was civilised aspect than those of France; they at once admitted. In both there was the all possess footpaths; the shops are as rich, tall and slender frame—the keen eye, the and the houses better. The climate is cer- pleasing elongated face; both were so calm tainly very delicious, but there is not so and gentle when at rest, both so quick and much delight in it as travellers tell us. This bounding when excited.”—pp. 12, 13. I am certain of, that the sensation of comfort, which can only exist in a cold climate,

Can any description be happier ? more than counterbalances the most luxuri- It brings Woulfe perfectly before our ous relaxation of the Italian air. You can- eyes -- before our eyes, who were long not conceive how I enjoyed the first piercing familiar with him; but we have no night on the Tyrolese Alps, when I found doubt that to entire strangers it will myself wrapped up between two feather- bave the same effect. In artistic power, beds; and if the animal enjoyment of both

the passage is equal to Goethe. these sensations is equal, ours possesses this In the year 1817, the rupture of a political advantage over theirs, that, being

blood-vessel in the lungs gave Woulfe. only possessed by those persons who are in easy circumstances, it engenders industry;

serious alarm. The apprehended danwhereas theirs, being within the reach of

ger, however, was greater than the everybody, begets indolence. In truth, la

event justified, and his professional bour is incompatible with the enjoyment of studies and pursuits were not interit. Not so with ours-it is not only ac- rupted. In 1819 he published a required by labour, but may be enjoyed in the markable pamphlet on the Catholic very act of labour.'”—pp. 10, 11. question. The pamphlet was admired

by Bushe and by Plunket. Lord It is only when one thinks of abridg- Grenville, to whom it was sent by ing such a narrative as this, that one Plunket, pronounced it to be, “in his feels how beautifully and how grace- opinion, the ablest piece of political fully it is written. It can only be read writing that had appeared since the in the book itself. Woulfe's health days of Burke." VOL. XLVI.-NO. CCLXXIII.

2 B

[graphic]

Woulfe's pamphlet we have never one year from another, except the vaseen, but the extracts here given jus- riations of his health, till his death, in tify Lord Grenville's praise. The cha- 1840. racter acquired for him by the pamph- Woulfe made a few speeches on polet aided him in his after career ; but litical subjects in the Catholic Associais said by Mr. Curran to have been tion, and at aggregate meetings. We likely to have done him some disservice should be glad they had been preservwith the attorneys. Any occupation ed. How far these or his speeches in unconnected with the immediate stu- Parliament influenced the bodies to dies of his profession leads the shrewd which they were addressed, we are attorney to distrust the competency unable to say. When at the bar, his for the business of his profession of a appeals to juries were often very sucbarrister supposed to know anything cessful. else, or to think of anything else. It Mr. Curran mentions Woulfe's hav. would appear that Woulfe sometimes ing given up the assistant-barristership contributed to periodical publications. of the county of Galway, which was An article, in which he reviewed God, worth £900 a year. His health was win on "Population," in Campbell's declining. He held, with the barris. Magazine, is mentioned; and he wrote tership, another office—that of crownan essay, which was entitled, “ Amend.

prosecutor - giving an income of the ment of the Laws of Real Property in same amount. His health he found England," which he proposed printing unequal to the duties of both, and he either in a separate volume, or in a series retained that which interfered least of essays in the New Morithly. It was with his ordinary chances of profesnot felt to have the popular interest sional employment. He, perhaps, also which would render the latter mode of remembered, when he made the choice, publication a prudent speculation for that the office which he continued to the proprietor of the Magazine. Mr. keep was not incompatible with his Curran expresses his agreement with holding a seat in Parliament, which this decision. We suspect that it was was an object which he probably then a mistake in the conduct of that pub- contemplated. He soon afterwards lication, that topics really engaging became member for the borough of the public mind were avoided. We Cashel. In 1836 he was solicitor-ges, have not a doubt that such papers as neral for Ireland, and in the next year Woulfe would have produced on such attorney. In 1838 he became chief subjects would have greatly aided the baron. circulation of any publication in which In à memoir of Chief Justice Bushe, they appeared. It is a mistake to think in the eighteenth volume of this Jour. that each reader of any of this class of nal, it is stated, apparently on good publications reads each article in it. authority, that when, on the death of Secure on each subject the best writers, Chief Baron Joy, the right to fill the wherever that is possible, and this ren. office left vacant devolved on Woulfe ders almost certain an increased circu- - the Attorney-General - he urged lation. Assume real information on on the Government the fitness of apany subject to be given, and you have pointing Baron Pennefather, propose secured purchasers for the work in ing to resign his own claims, and which it appears. Interruptions of one take the office of puisne baron, which kind or other interfered with his get- Baron Pennefather's promotion would ting this essay out as a book, till other leave vacant; and that it was only on works appeared which dealt with the finding it impossible to effect this arsubject so much in the way he pro- rangement that he accepted the place posed, as to make him give up the of Chief Baron. This fact, so highly project.

to Woulfe's honour, is not stated in Plunket, about two years after the Curran's memoir. For Woulfe it date of Woulfe's pamphlet, became would have been fortunate had it been attorney-general, and made Woulfe accomplished; for the duties of Chief prosecuting counsel on the Munster Baron—then considerably greater than circuit, which increased his annual in- at present were soon found too much come by a sum between £700 and for his health ; and at the time of his £1,000 a-year. His progress was, af. death, within two years of his promoter this, one of uninterrupted success tion, he was occupied in making an ar- nothing in any way to distinguish rangement for his retirement.

We do not know whether any formal life of Chief Justice Bushe has been written ; but it was impossible that, of a great man so long before the public, there should not be many inci. dental notices. In Mr. Wills's " Lives of Illustrious Irishmen," his character is sketched by a faithful and friendly hand. The same writer has publish, ed a little essay on “ The Evidences of Christianity" by the late Chief. Justice Bushe-an essay of very remarkable power and beauty.* In the eighteenth volume of this Journal there is a sketch of Bushe's life and fortunes, written while he was still Chief Justice, and in which are several extracts from his speeches while yet at the bar. In Finlay's “ Miscellanies” we have him described while still Solicitor-General. Lord Brougham has preserved a record of his conversations when he visited London to be examined before some Parliamentary Committee or Royal Commission. In Sheil's “ Legal and Political Sketches," one of the best and most brilliant chapters is devoted to Bushe; and in Mr. Curran's life of Wallacet will be found his estimate of some of the peculiar characteristics of Bushe's mind. We refer to all and each of these, satisfied that many of our readers will look at the books, and thank us for the references. But we must for ourselves say, that the little book published by Mr. Wills, which we mention in the hope of bringing it before some of our readers to whom it may be new, and the record of Bushe's conversations with Mr. Curran here preserved, have given us what we believe to be a truer picture of Bushe than any or all the rest.

His narrative of these conversations is thus introduced by our author :

there, surrounded by a numerous family cir: cle. I had the good luck to be the only stranger, and thus came to be at his side, and to have him all to myself, for many hours daily. At first he used to retire after breakfast to finish off some judgments that he was to deliver in his court in the ensuing term ; but this occupation lasted for only four or five days, and then he felt himself to be (as he said) in the delicious state of being perfectly solutus curis for the remainder of the vacation. Every day at one o'clock a pair of horses were brought to his hall door for us. From the heat of the weather (it was "the hot summer of 1826') we always moved along merely at a walking pace; secure, however, from the same state of the weather, against any annoyance from sudden showers. We seldom returned to Kilmurry before five o'clock. Then came dinner, and at no long interval tea; and the moment tea was over, the Chief Justice rose, and proposed to me a stroll with him through the grounds. We had no occasion to keep to the gravel walks; the grass was as dry as the carpets we had left; and accordingly his habit was to push on at once for the fields, and plunging into them, and crossing, and recrossing them, to prolong the stroll often till the approach of midnight.

* On the second or third evening of my visit, the conversation turned on Boswell's "Life of Johnson,' which, by the way, the Chief Justice said, was to him the most delightful of books, first, because he found everything in it so charming in itself; and next, because he no sooner finished it, than he forgot it all, and so could return to it, toties quoties, and be sure to find it all as charming as before, and almost as new.".

pp. 77, 78.

“ Upon one occasion of my life, I had not a single opportunity, but opportunities continued for several days, of appreciating the late Chief Justice Bushe's captivating powers as a tête-à-tête companion.

" Just after the close of the summer cir. cuits of the year 1826, I went, by invitation, to stay for some time with him at his old ancestral place of residence, Kilmurry, in the county of Kilkenny. He was, according to his annual custom, passing his long vacation

The conversation led our author to try how far he could enact the part of committing to paper the conversations of the two or three preceding days. They were jotted down in pencil, without the slightest thought of publication :

“In thus giving publicity to these frag, ments of Charles Kendal Bushe's familiar conversation, I should be doing a grievous injustice to the memory of that accomplished man, if I were to intimate that, in themselves, they can convey any but the faintest idea of what that conversation was. They may lead his surviving intimates to recognise him, but they never can enable a stranger to him to know him. Even if I could offer a literal transcript of every word that fell from him, how much would still be

"A Summary View of the Evidences of Christianity, in a Letter from the late Chief Justice Bushe." 1845.

† "Sketches," &c. Vol. i., p. 341.

Woulfe's pamphlet we have never one year from another, except the vaseen, but the extracts here given jus- riations of his health, till his death, in tify Lord Grenville's praise. The cha- 1840. racter acquired for him by the pamph- Woulfe made a few speeches on polet aided him in his after career; but litical subjects in the Catholic Associais said by Mr. Curran to have been tion, and at aggregate meetings. We likely to have done him some disservice should be glad they had been preservwith the attorneys. Any occupation ed. How far these or his speeches in unconnected with the immediate stu- Parliament influenced the bodies to dies of his profession leads the shrewd which they were addressed, we are attorney to distrust the competency unable to say.. When at the bar, his for the business of his profession of a appeals to juries were often very sucbarrister supposed to know anything cessful. else, or to think of anything else. It Mr. Curran mentions Woulfe's hav. would appear that Woulfe sometimes ing given up the assistant-barristership contributed to periodical publications. of the county of Galway, which was An article, in which he reviewed God. worth £900 a-year. His health was win on “Population," in Campbell's declining. He held, with the barris. Magazine, is inentioned; and he wrote tership, another office—that of crownan essay, which was entitled, “Amenda prosecutor - giving an income of the ment of the Laws of Real Property in same amount. His health he found England,” which he proposed printing unequal to the duties of both, and he either in a separate volume, or in a series retained that which interfered least of essays in the New Monthly. It was with his ordinary chances of profesnot felt to have the popular interest sional employment. He, perhaps, also which would render the latter mode of remembered, when he made the choice, publication a prudent speculation for that the office which he continued to. the proprietor of the Magazine. Mr. keep was not incompatible with his Curran expresses his agreement with holding a seat in Parliament, which this decision. We suspect that it was was an object which he probably then a mistake in the conduct of that pub- contemplated. He soon afterwards lication, that topics really engaging became member for the borough of the public mind were avoided. We Cashel. In 1836 he was solicitor-gehave not a doubt that such papers as

neral for Ireland, and in the next year Woulfe would have produced on such attorney. In 1838 he became chief subjects would have greatly aided the baron. circulation of any publication in which In a memoir of Chief Justice Bushe, they appeared. It is a mistake to think in the eighteenth volume of this Jourthat each reader of any of this class of nal, it is stated, apparently on good publications reads each article in it. authority, that when, on the death of Secure on each subject the best writers, Chief Baron Joy, the right to fill the wherever that is possible, and this ren. office left vacant devolved on Woulfe ders almost certain an increased circu- - the Attorney-General - he urged lation. Assume real information on on the Government the fitness of apany subject to be given, and you have pointing Baron Pennefather, propossecured purchasers for the work in ing to resign his own claims, and which it appears. Interruptions of one take the office of puisne baron, which kind or other interfered with his get- Baron Pennefather's promotion would ting this essay out as a book, till other leave vacant; and that it was only on works appeared which dealt with the finding it impossible to effect this arsubject so much in the way he pro- rangement that he accepted the place posed, as to make him give up the of Chief Baron. This fact, so highly project.

to Woulfe's honour, is not stated in Plunket, about two years after the Curran's memoir. For Woulfe it date of Woulfe's pamphlet, became would have been fortunate had it been attorney-general, and made Woulfe accomplished; for the duties of Chief prosecuting counsel on the Munster Baron-then considerably greater than circuit, which increased his annual in. at present-were soon found too much come by a sum between £700 and for his health ; and at the time of his £1,000 a-year. His progress was, af- death, within two years of his promoter this, one of uninterrupted success tion, he was occupied in making an ar- nothing in any way to distinguish rangement for his retirement.

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