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Cas. I know not what may fall; I like it not.
360. Bru. Mark Antony, here, take you Cæsar's body.

You shall not in your funeral speech blame us,
But speak all good you can devise of Cæsar ;
And say, you do't by our permission ;
Else shall you not have any hand at all
About his funeral. And you shall speak
In the same pulpit whereto I am going,
After my speech is ended.

Ant. Be it so ;
I do desire no more.
Bru. Prepare the body then, and follow us.

[Exeunt all but ANTONT.
Ant. 0, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth,
That I am meek and gentle with these butchers !
Thou art the ruins of the noblest man
That ever lived in the tide of times.
Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood !
Over thy wounds now do I prophesy,-
Which, like dumb mouths, do ope their ruby lips,
To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue ;
A curse shall light upon the loins of men ;
Domestic fury, and fierce civil strife,
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy :
Blood and destruction shall be so in use,
And dreadful objects so familiar,
That mothers shall but smile, when they behold
Their infants quartered with the hands of war;
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds :
And Cæsar's spirit ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side, come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines, with a monarch's voice,
Cry Havoc! and let slip the dogs of war ;
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial.

Enter a SERVANT.
You serve Octavius Cæsar, do you not ?

Serv. I do, Mark Antony.
365. Ant. Cæsar did write for him to come to Rome.

Serv. He did receive his letters, and is coming :
And bid me say to you by word of mouth, ---
O Cæsar!

[Seeing the Body.
Ant. Thy heart is big, get thee apart and weep.
Passion, I see, is catching ; for mine eyes,
Seeing those beads of sorrow stand in thine,
Began to water. Is thy master coming ?

Serv. He lies to-night within seven leagues of Rome.

Ant. Post back with speed, and tell him what hath chanced : Here is a mourning Rome, a dangerous Rome, No Rome of safety for Octavius yet; Hie hence, and tell him so. Yet, stay a while ; Thou shalt not back, till I have borne this corpse Into the market-place : there shall I try, In my oration, how the people take The cruel issue of these bloody men ; According to the which, thou shalt discourse To young Octavius of the state of things. Lend me your hand.

[Exeunt with CÆSARs body.

SCENE II.-The same. The Forum.

Enter Brutus and Cassius, and a throng of CITIZENS.

370. Cit. We will be satisfied ; let us be satisfied.

Bru. Then follow me, and give me audience, friends.-
Cassius, go you into the other street,
And part the numbers.--
Those that will hear me speak, let 'em stay here;
Those that will follow Cassius, go with him;
And public reasons shall be rendered
Of Cæsar's death.

1 Cit. I will hear Brutus speak.

2 Cit. I will hear Cassius ; and compare their reasons, When severally we hear them rendered.

[Exit CASSIUS with some of the CITIZENS.

BRUTUS goes into the Rostrum. 3 Cit. The noble Brutus is ascended : Silence! 375. Bru. Be patient till the last.

Romans, countrymen, and lovers! hear me for my cause ; and be silent, that you may hear: believe me for mine honour ; and have respect to mine honour, that you may believe : censure me in your wisdom ; and awake your senses, that you may the better judge. If there be any in this assembly, any dear friend of Cæsar's, to him I say, that Brutus' love to Cæsar was no less than his. If, then, that friend demand, why Brutus rose against Cæsar, this is my answer ;-Not that I loved Cæsar less, but that I loved Rome more. Had you rather Cæsar were living, and die all slaves, than that Cæsar were dead, to live all freemen? As Cæsar loved me, I weep for him ; as he was fortunate, I rejoice at it ; as he was valiant, I honour him: but, as he was ambitious, I slew him. There is tears, for his love; joy, for his fortune; honour, for his valour; and death, for his ambition. Who is here so base, that would be a bondman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who is here so rude, that would not be a Roman? If any, speak; for him have I offended. Who

is here so vile, that will not love his country? If any, speak;
for him have I offended. I pause for a reply.
Cit. None, Brutus, none.

[Several speaking at once. Bru. Then none have I offended. I have done no more to Cæsar, than you shall do to Brutus. The question of his death is enrolled in the Capitol : his glory not extenuated, wherein he was worthy ; nor his offences enforced, for which he suffered death.

Enter Antony and others, with CÆSAR’s Body. Here comes his body, mourned by Mark Antony: who, though he had no hand in his death, shall receive the benefit of his dying, a place in the commonwealth ; as which of you shall not? With this I depart; That, as I slew my best lover for the good of Rome, I have the same dagger for myself, when it shall please my country to need my death.

Cit. Live, Brutus, live! live!

1 Cit. Bring him with triumph home unto his house. 380. 2 Cit. Give him a statue with his ancestors.

3'Cit. Let him be Cæsar.

4 Cit. Cæsar's better parts Shall now be crowned in Brutus.

1 Cit. We'll bring him to his house with shouts and clamours.

Bru. My countrymen,385. 2 Cit. Peace; silence! Brutus speaks.

1 Cit. Peace, ho!

Bru. Good countrymen, let me depart alone,
And, for my sake, stay here with Antony :
Do grace to Cæsar's corpse, and grace his speech
Tending to Cæsar's glories ; which Mark Antony,
By our permission, is allowed to make.
I do entreat you, not a man depart,
Save I alone, till Antony have spoke.

[Exit. 1 Cit. Stay, ho! and let us hear Mark Antony.

3 Cit. Let him go up into the public chair; We'll hear him :-Noble Antony, go up. 390. Ant. For Brutus' sake, I am beholden to you.

4. Cit. What does he say of Brutus ?

3 Cit. He says, for Brutus' sake, He finds himself beholden to us all.

4 Cit. 'Twere best he speak no harm of Brutus here.

1 Cit. This Cæsar was a tyrant.
395. 3 Cit. Nay, that's certain :
We are blessed, that Rome is rid of him.

2 Cit. Peace; let us hear what Antony can say.
Ant. You gentle Romans,-
Cit. Peace, ho! let us hear him.
Ant. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears;

I come to bury Cæsar, not to praise him.
The evil, that men do, lives after them;
The good is oft interred with their bones;
So let it be with Cæsar. The noble Brutus
Hath told you, Cæsar was ambitious :
If it were so, it was a grievous fault;
And grievously hath Cæsar answered it.
Here, under leave of Brutus, and the rest
(For Brutus is an honourable man;
Šo are they all, all honourable men);
Come I to speak in Cæsar's funeral.
He was my friend, faithful and just to me:
But Brutus says, he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
He hath brought many captives home to Rome,
Whose ransoms did the general coffers fill :
Did this in Cæsar seem ambitious ?
When that the poor have cried, Cæsar hath wept :
Ambition should be made of sterner stuff:
Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious;
And Brutus is an honourable man.
You all did see, that on the Lupercal,
I thrice presented him a kingly crown,
Which he did thrice refuse. Was this ambition ?
Yet Brutus says, he was ambitious;
And, sure, he is an honourable man.
I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke,
But here I am to speak what I do know.
You all did love him once, not without cause;
What cause withholds you, then, to mourn for him ?
O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts,
And men have lost their reason!-Bear with me;
My heart is in the coffin there with Cæsar,

And I must pause till it come back to me.
400. 1 Cit. Methinks, there is much reason in his sayings.

2 Cit. If thou consider rightly of the matter,
Cæsar has had great wrong.

3 Cit. Has he not, masters ?
I fear, there will a worse come in his place.

4 Cit. Marked ye his words ? He would not take the crown; Therefore, 'tis certain he was not ambitious.

1 Cit. If it be found so, some will dear abide it.
405. 2 Cit. Poor soul! his eyes are red as fire with weeping.

3 Cit. There's not a nobler man in Rome than Antony.
4 Cit. Now mark him, he begins again to speak. i

Ant. But yesterday, the word of Cæsar might
Have stood against the world : now lies he there,
And none so poor to do him reverence.

O masters! if I were disposed to stir
Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage,
I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong,
Who, you all know, are honourable men :
I will not do them wrong ; I rather choose
To wrong the dead, to wrong myself, and you,
Than I will wrong such honourable men.
But here's a parchment, with the seal of Cæsar,
I found it in his closet, 'tis his will :
Let but the commons hear this testament
(Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read),
And they would go and kiss dead Cæsar's wounds,
And dip their napkins in his sacred blood;
Yea, beg a hair of him for memory,
And, dying, mention it within their wills,
Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy,
Unto their issue.

4 Cit. We'll hear the will: Read it, Mark Antony. 410. Cit. The will, the will: we will hear Cæsar's will.

Ant. Have patience, gentle friends, I must not read it ;
It is not meet you know how Cæsar loved you.
You are not wood, you are not stones, but men ;
And, being men, hearing the will of Cæsar,
It will inflame you, it will make you mad;
'Tis good you know not that you are his heirs ;
For if you should, 0, what would come of it!

4 Cit. Read the will; we will hear it, Antony; you shall read us the will; Cæsar's will.

Ant. Will you be patient ? Will you stay a while ?
I have overshot myself, to tell you of it.
I fear, I wrong the honourable men,
Whose daggers have stabbed Cæsar: I do fear it.

4 Cit. They were traitors : Honourable men! 415. Cit. The will! the testament!

2 Cit. They were villains, murderers : The will, read the will!

Ant. You will compel me, then, to read the will ?
Then make a ring about the corpse of Cæsar,
And let me show you him that made the will.
Shall I descend? And will you give me leave ?

Cit. Come down.
2 Cit. Descend.

[He comes down from the pulpit. 420. 3 Cit. You shall have leave.

4 Cit. A ring ; stand round.
1 Cit. Stand from the hearse, stand from the body.
2 Cit. Room for Antony ;-most noble Antony..

Ant. Nay, press not so upon me; stand far off. 4:25. Cit. Staná back! room! bear back!

Ant. If you have tears, prepare to shed them now,

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