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And many a flattering stone I viewed,

O'er those who once bad wealth possessed.

" My child,” the father said, While a soft passing shower to Earth was

given, And round them shone the arch of heav'n,

“ Thy dew-drops are not dead; For nothing withers from our world But in yon Heav'n exists with brighter

bloom unfurl'd.

A faded beech its shadow brown

Threw o'er a grave where sorrow slept,
On which, though scarce with grass o'er-

grown,
Two ragged children sat and wept.

“ Seest thou yon beaming bow? A piece of bread between them lay, There live the pearly dew-drops mourn'd

Which neither seemed inclined to take; by thee,

And yet they looked so much a prey
Re-set, and shining gloriously-

To want, it made my heart to ache.
Jewels in Eden now:
And nothing know we bright or fair My little children, let me know
But like those drops will pass--and live in Why you in such distress appear;
radiance there.

And why you wasteful from you throw
That bread, which many a

one would “ All fades we love below;

cheer?
The blossomnings of hope, of life, will die;
Dew-drops, and flowers, and infancy, The little boy, in accents sweet,
Alike a withering know:

Replied, while tears each other chased;
Yet when they from our world are riven, Lady, we've not enough to eat;
Their sweets like incense rise, to live again Oh ! if we had, we would not waste :
in Heaven."

“ But sister Mary's naughty grown, Propbetic worris! that child,

And will not eat, whate'er I say; In its soul's brightness, while yet morn- Though sure I

the bread's her own, has passed

As she has tasted none to-day."
Ere Earth a sorrow round it cast,
Or serpent's trail detil'd;

“ Indeed,” the wan, starved Mary said, And like the dew-drops of its love,

“ Till Henry eats, I'll eat no more : Exists in glory now-a radiant one above! For yesterday I got some bread;

He's had none since the day before.”

am,

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REAL MOURNERS.

She told us that she soon should die,

And bade us love each other well.

CRABBE.

“ She said, that when the war was o'er, Perhaps we might our father see;

Yes! there are real moarners- I have seen Bat if we never saw him more

A fair, sad girl, mild, suffering, and serene; That God our Father then would be.

Attention, through the day, her duties

claimed, “She kissed us both-and then she died ! And to be useful as resigned she aimed : And we no more a mother have;

Neatly she drest, nor vainly seem'd to expect Here many a day we've sat and cried Pity for grief, or pardon for neglect; Together on poor mother's grave.

But when her wearied parents sank to sleep,

She sought her place to meditate and weep : “But when my father came not here,

Then to her mind was all the past displayed, I thought, if we could find the sea, Tbat faithful Memory brings to Sorrow's aid: We should be sure to meet him there, For then she thought on one regretted youth, And once again might happy be.

Her tender trust, and his unquestion'd truth.

In every place she wandered where they'd " We hand in hand went many a mile,

been, And asked our way of all we met;

And sadly-sacred held the parting scene; And some did sigh, and some did smile,

Where last for sea he took his leave that And we of some did victuals get.

place

With double interest would she nightly trace: “But when we reach'd the sea, and fonnd For long the courtship was, and he would say, 'Twas one great water round us spread;

Each time he sailed_"This once and then We thought, that father must be drowned, the day :" And cried, and wished, we both were dead. Yet prudence tarried; but when last he went,

He drew from pitying love a full consent. “ So we returned to mother's grave,

And only long with her to be ; For Goody, when this bread she gave, Happy he sailed, and great the care she Said, father died beyond the sea.

tvok,

That he should softly sleep, and smartly look; “Then since no parent here we have, White was his better linen, and his check

We'll go and search for God around : Was made more trim than any on the deck ; Lady, pray, can you tell us where

And every comfort men at sea can know, That God, our Faiber, may be found ! Was hers to buy, to make, and to bestow :

For he to Greenland sailed, and much she He lives in heaven, mother said,

told, And Goody says, that mother's there; How he should guard against the climate's “ So, if she thinks we want his aid,

cold I think, perhaps she'll send him here." Yet saw not danger; dangers he'd withstood,

Nor could she trace the fever in his blood : I clasped the prattlers to my breast, His messmates smiled at flushings in hi

And cried, “Come both, and live with me; cheek, I'll clothe you, feed you, give you rest, And he too smiled, but seldom would he And will a second mother be :

speak;

For now he felt the danger, felt the pain, And God shall be your Father still; With grievous symptoms he could not exTwas he in mercy sent me here,

plain : To teach you to obey his will,

Hope was awakened as for home he sailed, Your steps to guide, your hearts to cheer.” And quickly sank, and never more prevailed.

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He called his friends, and prefaced with a When in her way she meets them, they sigh

appear A lover's message_"Thomas, I must die. Peculiar people-death has made them dear. “Would I could see my Sally, and could rest He named his friend, but then his hand she My throbbing temples on her faithful breast, prest, And gazing go !-if not, this trifle take, And fondly whispered, “ Thou must go to And say, till death I wore it for her sake. rest :" Yes! I must die-Blow on, sweet breeze, "I go," he said ; but as he spoke, she found blow on!

His hand more cold, and fluttering was the Give me one look, before my life be gone ! sound ! Dh! give me that, and let me not despair, Then gazed affrightened ; bilt she caught a One last, fond look! and now repeat the last,

A dying louk of love and all was past !

prayer."

sit,

He had his wish, had more-I will not

She placed a decent stone his grave above, paint

Neatly engraved-an offering of her love ; The lovers' meeting-She beheld him faint: For that she wrought, for that forsook ber Witb tender fears, she took a nearer view,

bed, Her terrors doubling as her hopes withdrew; Awake alike to duty, and the dead; He tried to smile, and, half succeeding said, She would have grieved, had friends pre-- Yes! I must die !" and hope for ever fled !

sumed to spare Still long sbe nursed him-tender thoughts The least assistance—'twas her proper care.

mean time Were interchanged, and hopes and views Here will she come, and on the grave will

snblime. To her he came to die, and every day Folding her arms, in long abstracted fit; She took some portion of the dread away; But if observer pass, will take her round, With him she prayed, to him bis Bible read, | And careless seem, for she would not be Soothed the faint heart, and held the aching found; head:

Then go again ; and thus her hour employ, She came with smiles the hour of pain to While visions please her, and while woes cheer:

destroy. A she sighed ; alone she shed the tear; Then, as if breaking from a cloud, she gave Forbear, sweet maid ! nor be by fancy led, Fresh light, and gilt the prospect of the grave. To hold mysterious converse with the dead;

For sure at length thy thoughts, thy spirit's

pain One day he lighter seemed, and they forgot | In this sad conflict will disturb thy brain; The care, the dread, the anguish of their lot; All have their tasks and trials! Thine are They spoke with cheerfulness, and seemed hard, to think,

But short the time, and glorious the reward ; Yet said not so,“ Perhaps he will not sink :" | Thy patient spirit to thy duties give, A sudden brightness in his look appeared, Regard the dead! but to the living, live! A sudden vigour in his voice was heard. She had been reading in the Book of Prayer, And led him forth, and placed him in his chair;

LYCIDAS. Lively he seemed, and spoke of all he knew,

MILTON. The friendly many, and the favourite few

; Nor one that day did he to mind recal, So sinks the day-star in the ocean-bed But she has treasured, and she loves them all; | And yet anon repairs his drooping head,

ore

And tricks his beams, and with new-spangled | Hearts in that time closed o'er the trace

Of vows once fondly poured, Flames in the forehead of the morning sky; And strangers took the kinsman's place,

So Lycidas sank low, but mounted high, At many a joyous board. Through the dear might of him that walk's Graves which true love had wash'd with tears the waves,

Were left to heaven's bright rain; Where other groves and other streams Fresh hopes were born for other yearsalong,

He never smild again! With nectar pare his oozy locks he laves,

And hears the unexpressive nuptial song: In the blest kingdoms meek of joy and love. There entertain him all the saints above,

FADING FLOWERS. In solemn troops, and sweet societies,

C. WESLEY.
That sing, and singing in their glory move,
And wipe the tears for ever from his eyes. The morning flowers display their sweets,

And gay their silken leaves unfold,
As careless of the noontide heats,
As fearless of the evening cold.

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ANON.

IMITATION OF GRAY'S ELEGY IN | In yon lone pile, o'er which hath sternly A COUNTRY CHURCH-YARD.

pass'd The heavy hand of all-destroying Time,

Through whose low mouldering aisles now No airy dreams their simple fancies fired; sighs the blast, No thirst for wealth, nor panting after fame; And round whose altars grass and ivy climb. But truth divine, sublimer hopes inspired, And urged them onward to a nobler aim. They gladly thronged, their grateful hymus

to raise, From every cottage, with the day arose Oft as the calm and holy sabbath shone ; The hallowed voice of spirit-breathing prayer; The mingled tribute of their prayers and And artless anthems, at its peaceful close, praise, Like holy incense, charmed the evening air. In sweet communion rose before the throne.

Though they, each tome of human lore un- Here, from those honoured lips, which sacred known,

fire The brilliant path of science never trod, From heaven's high chancery hath touched, The sacred volume claimed their hearts alone, they hear Which taught the way to glory and to God. Truths which their zeal inflame, their hopes

inspire, Here they from truth's eternal fountain drew Give wings to faith and check affliction's tear, The pare and gladdening waters day by day; Learnt, since our days are evil, fleet, and few, When life flowed by, and like an angel, To walk in wisdom's bright and peaceful Death way.

Came to release them to the world on high,

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