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Rasselas, 1759.
A Journey to the Hebrides, 1775.
Taxation no Tyranny, 1775.
Lives of the Poets, 1777–1781.

IV. CHRONOLOGICAL TABLE OF ENGLISH

HISTORY AND LITERATURE IN JOHN-
SON'S TIME

1701–1714. Queen Anne. 1709. The Tatler. 1711. The Spectator. 1714-1727. George I. 1715–1774. Louis XV., King of France. 1715. First Jacobite Rising under “James III.,” or “ The Old

Pretender." 1715. Pope's Iliad. 1723. Pope's Odyssey. 1726. Swift's Gulliver's Travels. 1727-1760. George II. 1730. Thomson's Seasons. 1732. Pope's Essay on Man. 1740–1786. Frederick II., “the Great," King of Prussia. 1740-1780. Maria Theresa, “ The Empress Queen” of Austria

and Hungary. 1740-1748. War of the Austrian Succession. (In America called

King George's War.) 1740. Richardson's Pamela.

1742. Fielding's Joseph Andrews. 1745–1746. Second Jacobite Rising under Charles Edward,

“ The Young Pretender.” 1748. Richardson's Clarissa Harlowe. 1749. Fielding's Tom Jones. 1751. Gray's Elegy. 1754. Hume's History of England. 1756. Burke's Sublime and Beautiful. 1756–1763. Seven Years' War. (In America called the French

and Indian War.) 1759. Sterne's Tristram Shandy. 1760–1820. George III. 1765. The Stamp Act. 1766. Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield. 1769. Letters of Junius. 1770. Goldsmith's Deserted Village. 1773. Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer. 1775. Battle of Lexington. Sheridan's Rivals. 1776. Declaration of Independence. Gibbon's Decline and

Fall of the Roman Empire. 1777. Sheridan's School for Scandal. 1783. Peace with America.

V. BIBLIOGRAPHY

(1) MACAULAY

Adams, Charles : Life Sketches of Macaulay.
Arnold, M. : Mixed Essays.

Bagehot: Estimate of Some Englishmen and Scotchmen.
Gladstone : Gleanings of Past Years.
Jebb : Lecture on Macaulay.
Jones, C. H.: Life of Lord Macaulay.
Minto : Manual of English Prose Literature.
Morison: Macaulay (English Men of Letters Series).
Morley : English Literature in the Reign of Victoria, Ch. VII.
Stephen : Hours in a Library, Third Series.
Taine : English Literature, Bk. V., Ch. III.
Trevelyan : Life and Letters of Macaulay. 2 Volumes.
Whipple : Essays and Reviews.

(2) JOHNSON AND HIS PERIOD Boswell: Life of Johnson. (The best edition is that of G.

Birkbeck Hill.) Carlyle : Essay on Boswell's Life of Johnson. (Extracts are

given in the Appendix.) D'Arblay, Mme. : Diary and Letters and Early Journals. Gosse : History of Eighteenth Century Literature. Grant: Johnson. (Great Writers Series.) Green: Short History of the English People. Hawkins : Life of Johnson. Hill, G. B.: Dr. Johnson, his Friends and his Critics. Lecky: History of England in the Eighteenth Century. Macaulay : Essays on Addison, Walpole, Earl of Chatham,

Goldsmith, Madame d'Arblay, and Croker's Boswell.
(Extracts from the one last named are given in the

Appendix.)
Minto: Manual of English Prose Literature.

Nichol: Literary Anecdotes of the Eighteenth Century.
Piozzi, Mrs.: Anecdotes of Dr. Johnson.
Scoone : Four Centuries of English Letters. (This contains in

part the correspondence of Johnson and Mrs. Thrale.) Stephen : Johnson (English men of Letters Series) ; Hours in

a Library; History of English Thought in the Eighteenth

Century.
Thackeray : English Humorists and The Four Georges.

VI. NOTE ON METHODS OF STUDY

It is impossible to lay down any method of study for this work which would suit even the majority of teachers or classes. Every teacher of English who is worth anything will have his own method of imbuing his pupils with a knowledge and love of the master works of our literature. The main point is to make the study interesting. A dry method, though it may be scholarly and thorough, with secondary school pupils at least, often defeats its own end. It makes no lasting impression. All the average pupil acquires is an extreme dislike for oựr classic literature. I well remember with what diabolical glee I burnt my Virgil when its study was completed — that Virgil which, in after years, I read with intense delight.

Macaulay's Life of Johnson is such a good narrative, so clearly and vivaciously told, that the pupils, if they are not at first bothered with technical points of style, will read it through with much pleasure. Those notes which give extracts from Boswell and other authorities on Johnson, and characteristic

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