The Final Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

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Apocryphile Press, 2005 - 256 страници
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The canon of Sherlock Holmes adventures by Arthur Conan Doyle contains fifty-six stories and four novels. But there were yet other adventures and artifacts pertaining to Mr. Holmes not listen in the canon. Peter Haining has collected them here, complete with informative and entertaining introductions. This special, revised collector's edition is profusely illustrated. A must for any Sherlock enthusiast.
 

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Haining puts together twelve more pieces of writing by Doyle and argues they should be part of the Sherlockian canon. But reading these it's clear why they're not in the canon: They're either (1) not about Holmes; (2) not by Doyle; or (3) not any good at all. Прочетете пълната рецензия

Съдържание

Introduction by Peter Haining
11
The Mystery of Uncle Jeremys Household
34
The Field Bazaar
76
The Story of the Lost Special
97
The Adventure of the Tall Man
115
The Case of the Man Who Was Wanted
138
Some Personalia about Sherlock Holmes
164
The Crown Diamond
177
How Watson Learned the Trick
192
The Mystery of Sasassa Valley
206
My Favourite Sherlock Holmes Adventures
224
The Unrecorded Cases of Sherlock Holmes
246
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Информация за автора (2005)

The most famous fictional detective in the world is Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. However, Doyle was, at best, ambivalent about his immensely successful literary creation and, at worst, resentful that his more "serious" fiction was relatively ignored. Born in Edinburgh, Doyle studied medicine from 1876 to 1881 and received his M.D. in 1885. He worked as a military physician in South Africa during the Boer War and was knighted in 1902 for his exceptional service. Doyle was drawn to writing at an early age. Although he attempted to enter private practice in Southsea, Portsmouth, in 1882, he soon turned to writing in his spare time; it eventually became his profession. As a Liberal Unionist, Doyle ran, unsuccessfully, for Parliament in 1903. During his later years, Doyle became an avowed spiritualist. Doyle sold his first story, "The Mystery of the Sasassa Valley," to Chambers' Journal in 1879. When Doyle published the novel, A Study in Scarlet in 1887, Sherlock Holmes was introduced to an avid public. Doyle is reputed to have used one of his medical professors, Dr. Joseph Bell, as a model for Holmes's character. Eventually, Doyle wrote three additional Holmes novels and five collections of Holmes short stories. A brilliant, though somewhat eccentric, detective, Holmes employs scientific methods of observation and deduction to solve the mysteries that he investigates. Although an "amateur" private detective, he is frequently called upon by Scotland Yard for assistance. Holmes's assistant, the faithful Dr. Watson, provides a striking contrast to Holmes's brilliant intellect and, in Doyle's day at least, serves as a character with whom the reader can readily identify. Having tired of Holmes's popularity, Doyle even tried to kill the great detective in "The Final Problem" but was forced by an outraged public to resurrect him in 1903. Although Holmes remained Doyle's most popular literary creation, Doyle wrote prolifically in other genres, including historical adventure, science fiction, and supernatural fiction. Despite Doyle's sometimes careless writing, he was a superb storyteller. His great skill as a popular author lay in his technique of involving readers in his highly entertaining adventures.

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